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May Wildlife Walk

I haven’t scooted down my regular route in a while so, as the weather was pleasant, we did the local dog walk on Friday. It was cloudy and cool, but not unpleasantly cold.

Acid yellow fields of oilseed rape in full bloom really stand out from the rest of the landscape .

Newly emerged arable crops are still so small that the rows are clearly visible.

There are plenty of lambs about too.

On the verges, dandelions and lime green spikes of crosswort dominate.

The first red campion flowers have opened. They will flower all summer.

A few bluebells can be seen in the shade of the hedgerows.

Patches of primroses, my favourite spring flower, are flowering profusely.

Garlic hedge mustard grows under the hedges too. This is the food plant of the orange tip butterfly. I only saw one. On sunny days there are more.

Under the trees the blue of the forget-me-nots stands out

Hawthorn flower buds are just opening. The saying “Cast ne’er a clout till may is out” refers to hawthorn or may blossom rather than the month. It basically means that you shouldn’t shed any clothes (clouts) until the flowers are fully open. I’m keeping the layers on for now!

I could hear lots of birds but no lapwings or skylarks, which usually nest in the fields here. I must listen out for them. I could hear the yellowhammers though. I love their lilting song.

Emerging bumblebees were particularly enjoying the nectar of the white deadnettles

In the woods, by the stream the red stems of water avens flowers are emerging.

I hadn’t noticed this fallen branch before .It will soon be hidden by foliage, but for now you can see the mesh of honeysuckle stems that have grown around it.

wildlife walks

Most of the trees are covered in ivy. The stems at the foot of the trunks are quite old and gnarled, but honeysuckle is starting to grow through these too.

So many signs of spring, with lots of new growth and emerging spring flowers. This is such a hopeful time of year.

What are the spring highlights in your neighbourhood?

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The Science of Autumn Colours

I’ve been watching the trees change colour over recent weeks. They are probably at their best around now. I always hope they’ll stay around for a long time, but invariably we get gales and the trees go bare overnight. Some of them that are growing in exposed spots have already lost almost all their leaves.

Others are still green.

Of those that have changed, I love the range of colours, from the buttery yellow of this willow…

…to the deep orange-red of this ornamental rowan (complete with bright yellow berries).

Some of the Acer (maple) family are the stars of autumn. This one positively glows!

Have you ever considered the science of this spectacle? The leaves are key to everything the tree does. In spring and summer, they are full of the green pigment, chlorophyll. This enables the tree to use energy from sunlight to convert the carbon in carbon dioxide to sugars (by the process of photosynthesis) The sugars fuel growth, flowering and seed production: everything else the tree does. Like a factory needs down time for maintenance and replacement of worn out parts, the tree’s leaves reach the end of their life in autumn. It is the breakdown of the green chlorophyll pigment that gives rise to the yellows, oranges and reds of autumn leaves.

Shorter day length stimulates the tree to produce a layer of weak cells at her base of each leaf stalk. This is called the abscission layer and causes the leaves to detach easily and fall.

The trees will now remain dormant during winter until fresh green leaves emerge in spring, ready to go into full production. Nature is pretty amazing!.

Having been out and about looking for autumn leaf colour, I forgot this in our own garden. It’s a little Japanese maple we’ve had for years that always looks stunning at this time of year.

How are the trees looking where you are?