Knit and Natter Friday: 21 February (Part Two)

This afternoon was the weekly meeting of The Knit and Natter Group at Alnwick Medical Group, which is held every Friday from 2.30-4pm in the Lower Building Meeting Room.

This week’s completed charity knits include a hat, and some baby clothes, along with my twiddle mitts. We’ve also been working on some of our own projects, including socks, a baby cardigan for a group member’s first grandchild, due in May. One of the practice staff popped in for some advice on a top-down baby jacket they are about to start, also for an eagerly awaited first grandchild. There’s always some advice available and the little pink and turquoise top in the picture is a top-down construction too, so we had an example to show her!

I’d love to hear about any knit and natter or craft groups you are involved with.

Knit and Natter Friday #4

The Knit and Natter Ladies have been busy again this week

We had another lively session at this afternoon’s Knit and Natter Group at Alnwick Medical Group. In the last week alone, our members have made another big batch of charity knits: hats, bonnets, tops and bootees.

You don’t need to be able to knit to contribute to the charity knits. Most of these hats were made on a knitting loom .

making a hat on a knitting loom

You may have used this sort of technique before . I know I did as a child, when it was known as French knitting or bobbin knitting . We used a cotton reel with nails stuck in the top or a purpose-made wooden figure with four metal loops stuck in the top – I think it was called a Knitting Nancy. They produced a thin knitted cord, but the modern looms like the one in the picture produce a wider tube. When the tube gets long enough, one end is gathered closed to make the hat.

The bigger the loom, the wider the tube and the bigger the hat…..and they are very quick and fun to make. Group members have made tiny ones for babies and large ones for homeless adults.

Have you used loom or French knitting before?

Knit and Natter Friday #3 – 29 November

More lovely knitwear for our charities.

Those attending today’s Knit and Natter group at Alnwick Medical Surgery, once again brought along an impressive haul of beautiful handknitted items. The little angel tops for premature babies are proving popular with some of the knitters, along with hats, baby cardigans and bootees. The item in the foreground is one of the “fish and chip baby” tops that we’ve made for a maternity clinic in Zambia, Knitted items were needed because newborns were being wrapped in newspaper (like fish and chips) to keep warm. We are grateful for all the donations of yarn and knitting needles that have been donated to help us make these items.

Over the weeks we’ve also swapped knitting and crochet patterns, taught each other new techniques and made some good friends. Sometimes there’s more nattering and laughter than knitting!

We were all pleased to see that the refurbishment of the room where we meet is going well – we now have new lighting and windows!

The practice staff are very supportive and have totally embraced knitting too – here is Jon, who managed to find a spare moment to knit in a break from officiating at a swimming gala.

I wonder if he read my post Where Do You Knit?

Knit and Natter Friday #2

The knitting group at our local GP surgery was meeting this afternoon This amazing selection of hats and baby clothes have been made by members and friends of the group in the last week alone. I can’t take credit for any of this I’m afraid. I will try and make a contribution soon.

The room where we meet is being renovated, so we had no lights today. One of our group members has kindly donated some plastic crates to keep the knitted items in (we’ll send them off to the relevant charities when we have a big enough batch). Now all that beautiful knitwear will stay dust-free during the renovations.

As it began to get dark this afternoon, rather than try to knit, it was a good opportunity to wind some wool off a skein – and I had help from a lovely lady who was telling me all about how she did this as a child – she and her sisters used to wind wool for her mother, who was a very keen knitter. I love to hear her knitting stories.